Education and Cultural Genocide: Working to Undo the Evils of the Past

1:00PM to 2:15PM January 31, 2019
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Ceremonial Hall, First Peoples House, University of Victoria
  Public
Posted By: 
RRU Staff

The University of Victoria’s Department of Indigenous Education invites you to join them for a presentation by Royal Roads Professor Emeritus Bernard Schissel of the College of Interdisciplinary Studies: “Education and Cultural Genocide: Working to Undo the Evils of the Past.”

This presentation is a culmination of work Schissel has done on the influence of educational policy and practice and the historical and contemporary oppression of Indigenous Canadians. He will discuss the theoretical origins of his work and reflect on the need to ground the literature of oppression in stories of individual and collective abuse, abuse which most often emanates from public policy. Importantly, he will discuss the role that education may serve in undoing many of the injustices of the past.

For more information on the presentation contact Indigenous Education at 250-721-7826 or at ied@uvic.ca.

About the speaker: Bernard Schissel is Professor Emeritus at Royal Roads University and the University of Saskatchewan and is the former head of the Doctor of Social Sciences Program at Royal Roads. His books include Applied Interdisciplinarity and the Scholar Practitioner: Narratives of Social Change (with Siomonn Pulla, Palgrave MacMillan, 2017); Marginality and Condemnation: An Introduction to Criminology, 3rd Edition (with Carolyn Brooks, Fernwood, 2015);  About Canada: Children and Youth (Fernwood, 2011); Still Blaming Children: Youth Conduct and the Politics of Child Hating (Fernwood, 2008); and The Legacy of School for Aboriginal People: Education, Oppression, and Emancipation (with Terry Wotherspoon, Oxford University Press, 2003). He is working on a SSHRC-funded project focusing on mentorship and political and civic engagement of students in China and Canada, and is also working on a manuscript focusing on teenage soldiers in western armies in the First and Second World Wars and the Vietnam War.