Roads to Research: Doc Soc Sci Students

12:00PM to 1:00PM March 16, 2016
Add to Calendar
Grant Quarterdeck
  Public
Roads to Research: Doc Soc Sci Students

The Office of Research Services is pleased to invite you to the third in a series of Roads to Research presentations by the Doctorate in Social Sciences second year students at RRU on Wednesday, March 16 from noon to 1 p.m. in the Quarterdeck.

The event will include the following presentations:

12:00 - 12:15  -  Wilmer Pulido - What are the appropriate cultural learning models that will increase early grade literacy outcomes for indigenous children between 3 to 8 years old in Venezuela?

12:15 - 12:30  -  Sylvie Plante - Dynamics of Entrepreneurial Social capital in Canadian innovation ecosystems

12:30 - 12:45  -  Steven Parfeniuk - During periods of retrenchment, in the post-secondary sector, how are decisions made about resource allocations and what is the institutional leader’s role in mitigating the impact of competing values?

12:45 - 1:00   -  Maria F. Anderson - From Static to Dynamic:  How information technology organizations evolve to foster innovation, productivity, and thriving          

All are welcome to attend the presentations, including the public. Coffee and cookies will be served. Please bring your lunch.

We hope you will join us for this intimate look at the ground breaking work of our RRU Doctorate in Social Sciences students on March 16.

Abstracts:

Wilmer Pulido - What are the appropriate cultural learning models that will increase early grade literacy outcomes for indigenous children between 3 to 8 years old in Venezuela?

The advocacy of education is critical and essential at this time, and the education of children is among the wealthiest principles of all the divine teachings (The Baha’i Faith, 2015).  The prosperity and progress of any nation is implausible unless this preeminent and vital concern is pursued. This research will deal with one of the most critical challenges in humanity: literacy, and more specifically with early grade literacy. Learning to read is a fundamental skill that serves as the foundation for an individual’s future learning and development, and, collectively, for a country’s social and economic development. When literacy is defined as more than merely reading and writing simple sentences, the scope of the problem increases substantially, involving nations at all stages of development. This research aims to understand how Indigenous children learn in order to find appropriate strategies that will increase literacy outcomes for indigenous children between 3 to 8 years old in Venezuela. In order to fulfill and deliver an educational program that meets the ‘essence’ of indigenous learning requires a deeper understanding of the appropriate cultural learning models of indigenous children, presently an under-researched area. The research question that I seek to answer is: What are the appropriate cultural learning models that will increase early grade literacy outcomes for indigenous children between 3 to 8 years old in Venezuela? The sub-questions of my research are the following: Increase understanding of How indigenous children learn naturally? How effective is the Venezuelan curriculum in supporting early grade literacy of indigenous children?; and recommend what appropriate strategies will increase literacy outcomes for indigenous children? The methodologies of ethnographic, participatory action research, and indigenous research will be used to conduct this research.

Sylvie Plante - Dynamics of Entrepreneurial Social capital in Canadian innovation ecosystems

Entrepreneurship and innovation are fundamental to economic growth. In Canada, multiple initiatives are in place to support entrepreneurship and innovation, however Canadian entrepreneurs face challenges in scaling up and achieving sustained growth. There has been recent recognition that entrepreneurship and innovation happen within the socially embedded contexts of regional innovation ecosystems, and evidence that mobilizing resources across social networks is a common factor in entrepreneurial success. Social capital has emerged as a concept to understand how entrepreneurs can use social networks to innovate, succeed, and sustain growth. This research proposes to investigate how social capital capabilities can be developed to support entrepreneurial growth within Canadian innovation ecosystems. A conceptual model of social capital capabilities will be developed from the literature, and applied empirically through a qualitative longitudinal study with Canadian entrepreneurs involved in the process of managing innovation, and scaling up for sustained growth.

Steven Parfeniuk - During periods of retrenchment, in the post-secondary sector, how are decisions made about resource allocations and what is the institutional leader’s role in mitigating the impact of competing values?

The purpose of my presentation will be to build the context, for a PHD dissertation, which will evaluate and assess retrenchment methodology/processes within predominately undergraduate post-secondary institutions. Over the past 20 years, post-secondary institutions have increasingly been required to review and implement strategies to invest in new educational programs, reduce/increase expenditures in existing programs and reduce/increase funding to administrative areas. Retrenchment decision making processes used with the sector vary and are rarely met with enthusiasm. However ‘a flavor of the month process’ the Robert Dickeson model has become the go to standard retrenchment decision making process in North America today. There has been limited peer reviewed research on retrenchment and no peer reviewed research on APP. My dissertation presentation will endeavour to establish my research question(s) and introduce how limited rational theory and the competing values framework will be used to support a case study doctoral research project.

Maria F. Anderson - From Static to Dynamic:  How information technology organizations evolve to foster innovation, productivity, and thriving

Information Technology (IT) organizations are complex subsystems within larger organizational systems. IT professionals must manage constant change and technology advancement; yet they may be employed by traditional, or conservative, organizations with static processes. In our knowledge economy, deconstructing and understanding what comprises a static versus a dynamic IT organization is challenging. There are more questions than answers as many factors must be considered such as the role of leadership, organizational culture and values alignment, levels of employee engagement and satisfaction, innovation, creativity, productivity, risk tolerance, and personal responsibility, among others. This dissertation proposal suggests that there is organizational and societal value in exploring how IT organizations evolve from being static to dynamic by fostering innovation, productivity, and thriving. In a global world where technology has become highly commoditized, if IT is to remain relevant in the near future, it is imperative that this transformation is explored, understood, and measurable in order to assist IT organizations and professionals to continue contributing to their profession and organizations in innovative ways. The primary research question for this dissertation proposal is: how can IT organizations evolve to become dynamic organizations that foster innovation, productivity, and thriving? The following subquestions will assist in exploring the transformational process of IT organizations:

  1. What defines a dynamic versus a static IT organization?
  2. What systems, processes, and leadership capabilities must co-exist to create dynamic IT organizations?
  3. What must change in order to encourage IT organizations to become dynamic, thereby fostering innovation, productivity, and thriving?