Engaged scholarship through the arts

  Public
By: 
s1richards

Singing and songwriting; graffiti, protest art, and mobile art installations; oral, digital, video, literary, métissage, and mixed media storytelling; drawing, photography, and other visual arts; Witness Blanketing and body mapping; embodying Indigenous literatures and expressing values through metaphor; dancing, performing, and more—as you can read in a new special issue of the Engaged Scholar Journal (Volume 5, Issue 2), these creative actions have become essential to the practice of engaged scholarship.

Co-editors and School of Leadership Studies core and associate faculty members, Drs. Kathy Bishop, Catherine Etmanski, and Beth Page are pleased to announce this hot off the press publication on the topic of engagement through the arts. With 45 proposals originally submitted, the published issue features 12 peer reviewed publications, five reports from the field, and four book reviews. Together, these pieces tell the story of increasing engagement through the arts. This compilation invites readers to open their hearts and minds to what these scholars have demonstrated is possible in the world of engaged scholarship and imagine what may be possible in other contexts.

The cover image is a panel from “The Witness Blanket,” a national monument of the Indian Residential School Era made of items collected from residential schools, churches, government buildings, and traditional structures from across Canada. The Artist is Carey Newman - Hayalthkin’geme and photo credit goes to Media One Inc. (used with permission).

As co-editors, we are delighted that this issue features the work of many members of the RRU community:

Peer reviewed articles:

  • The editors’ introduction to engaged scholarship through the arts (by Kathy Bishop, Catherine Etmanski, M. Beth Page)
  • Narrative Métissage as an Innovative Engagement Practice (with D.Soc.Sci. student, Brian Dominguez and led by core & associate faculty members, Kathy Bishop, Catherine Etmanski, M. Beth Page, & Cheryl Heykoop)
  • The heART of Activism: Stories of Community Engagement (by associate faculty member Bruno de Oliviera Jayme together with David Monk & Emilie Salvi)
  • Visualizing Inclusive Leadership: Using Arts-based Research to Develop an Aligned University Culture (by core faculty member Virginia L. McKendry)
  • Drawing Gender Equality: A Participatory Action Research Project with Educators in Northern Uganda (by core faculty member Shelley Jones)
  • Hey, Hey, Hey—Listen to What I Gotta Say: Songs Elevate Youth Voice in Alberta Wildfire Disaster Recovery (by RbD researcher Tamara Plush and core faculty member Robin Cox)

Report from the field:

  • Truthful Engagement: Making the Witness Blanket, an Ongoing Process of Reconciliation (by Carey Newman - Hayalthkin’geme with core faculty member, Catherine Etmanski)

Book reviews:

  • Uncommitted Crimes: The Defiance of the Artistic Imagi/nation by Tara Atluri (Reviewed by D.Soc.Sci. student, Nikki Bade)
  • Creative Social Change: Leadership for a Healthy World by Kathryn Goldman Schuyler (Reviewed by D.Soc.Sci. student, Brian Dominguez)
  • Grassroots Leadership and the Arts for Social Change by S. J. Erenrich and J. F. Wergin (Reviewed by D.Soc.Sci. student, Vanessa Daether)

These contributors demonstrate RRU’s value of creativity while articulating how they live RRU’s Learning, Teaching, and Research Model in exciting and innovative ways.

We are pleased to share that this is an open source journal so all articles are freely available

Please contact co-editors (Kathy, Catherine, or Beth) for more information.