Responsible resource development in Canada?

  Public
By: 
spulla
Siomonn Pulla Northern British Columbia

I am happy to share that my recent application to SSHRC’s Knowledge Synthesis Grant (KSG) on What effects will the quest for energy and natural resources have on our society and our position on the world stage has been successful. These KSGs provide an exciting opportunity to highlight emerging and trending areas of research; and will build on my ongoing practitioner and scholarly research on Indigenous engagement with natural resource development in Canada’s north. The research explores the question: How does the “social licencing” stage of major resource development projects honour Indigenous rights, experiences and aspirations towards development, and provide an opportunity for positive engagement between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians? The objectives of the research are to:

a)    provide a synthesis of existing research knowledge relating to “social licensing” and corporate-Indigenous relations and its role in supporting responsible resource development projects in Canada’s North; and

b)    identify knowledge gaps relating to “social licensing” and corporate-Indigenous relations and its role in supporting responsible resource development projects in Canada’s North.

This work provides the broad context for my research on the intersections between mobile learning technologies and Indigenous education in Canada. Impact Management and Benefit Agreements (IMBAs) are providing Indigenous communities with the capital to build capacity in their schools and invest in new technology to support and empower student outcomes. This is especially crucial for northern and remote Indigenous communities and is an important and understudied area of investigation. In April 2015 I received a SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Grant (KSG) to support my research on Indigenous mobile learning. Last month I was in Venice Italy to present the results of this research at the 14th annual international conference on mobile learning hosted by the International Association for Mobile Learning. And on November 16th I will be presenting my final research results on mobile learning at a SSHRC sponsored workshop in Ottawa. I will be sharing the research results of both these KSG projects on my website over the next year.

I feel really grateful to the amazing team in the Royal Roads Research Office for their amazing support and continued efforts to help me translate my complex and often abstract ideas into tangible and accessible grant applications. Their patience, encouragement and collaborative spirit in support of faculty and student research are incredible contributions to our amazing learning community at Royal Roads. 

 Dr. Siomonn Pulla

Photo Credit: Moris Mason, Kitselas First Nation